Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)

Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing - CSU San Bernardino
© Tom Benson
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing - Twentynine Palms, CA
© Tom Benson

The Cedar Waxwing is an uncommon and irregular visitor to campus between October and May, with two unseasonal records from mid June and early September. Although uncommon, they may occur in flocks of over 100 birds, though their abundance varies from year to year. When present they are often attracted to the fruiting camphor trees. The Cedar Waxwing is a common migrant and winter visitor in southern California.

High Count: 200, Average Count: highly variable

Adult Cedar Waxwings can be identified by their brown head and upperparts, black mask, gray wings and tail, and whitish or pale yellow belly. Adults also have red waxy tips to the wing coverts (middle feathers on the folded wing) and yellow waxy tips to the tail feathers. Juveniles are basically duller versions of the adults, but are whitish below with grayish streaking on the breast, and they lack the waxy tips to the wings and tail feathers.


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