Yellow Warbler-rumped (Setophaga coronata)

Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler, male - CSU San Bernardino
© Tom Benson
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler, female - Chino, CA
© Tom Benson

The Yellow-rumped Warbler is a common wintering bird on campus from October to April, mirroring its general status and distribution in southern California (although it is an uncommon breeder in high elevation coniferous forests). For many southern California birders, the arrival of Yellow-rumped Warblers and White-crowned Sparrows (probably our two most common and abundant wintering birds) in late September signals the changing of the seasons: summer is over and winter is on its way.

High Count: 50, Average Count: 10-25

All Yellow-rumped Warblers can be identified by their bright yellow rumps. Breeding males (seen in photo above in April) have medium gray upperparts, black breast, white belly and wing patches, and yellow patches on the crown, throat, sides, and rump. Females and non-breeding males are general brownish gray above and white below; the yellow patches on the crown, throat, and sides may be very faint.


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