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Department of Biology

Department of Biology Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Biology is to contribute to the comprehensive liberal arts curriculum by fostering in students an appreciation of the relevance of the biological sciences to their lives and the choices they will be faced with as members of a society experiencing rapid technological advances. To this end, students will develop knowledge and skills that will enable them to evaluate the impact of their decisions on local, regional and global issues concerning the economy, personal health and welfare, and the environment. Students completing the biology major will be prepared for entry-level careers in science or to pursue advanced training in graduate and professional schools. To fulfill the mission, the biology curriculum is designed to address seven goals:

  • To provide an understanding of the mechanics, application and limitations of the scientific process
  • Develop an appreciation and understanding of evolution and the diversity of life
  • Demonstrate the relationships between structure, function and energy in living systems
  • Culture an appreciation for the historical development of scientific knowledge
  • Instruct students in effective utilization of discipline-specific information resources
  • Develop technical and analytical skills appropriate to modern biological investigation
  • Enhance both written and oral communication skills appropriate to the discipline
Skillman, John

Dr. John B. Skillman

Professor

Phone 909.537.5276
FAX 909.537.7038
skillman@csusb.edu


Education

B.Sc., Oregon State University
Ph.D., Duke University
Postdoctoral Fellow, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute


Undergraduate Courses

Bio 200 Biology of the Cell
Bio 354 The Biology of Higher Plants
Bio 431 Plant Physiology
Bio 450 Ecology


Research Interests


Selected Publications

Skillman, J.B., K.L. Griffin, S. Earll and M. Kusama. 2011. Photosynthetic Productivity: Can Plants do Better?, Chapter 3 in: Thermodynamics - Systems in Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium, Dr. Juan Carlos Moreno Piraján (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-307-283-8, InTech, DOI: 10.5772/20192. (online)

Skillman, J.B. 2008. Quantum yield variation across the three pathways of photosynthesis: not yet out of the dark. Journal of Experimental Botany. 59:1647-1661.

Skillman, J.B., M. Garcia, A. Virgo, and K. Winter. 2005. Growth irradicance effects on photosynthesis and growth in two co-occurring shade tolerant neotropical perennials of contrasting photosynthetic pathways. American Journal of Botany 92:1811-1819.

Silvera, K., J.B. Skillman and J.W. Dalling. 2003. Seed germination, seedling growth, and habitat partitioning in two morphotypes of Trema micrantha in a seasonal tropical forest in Panama. Journal of Tropical Ecology 19:27-34.

Valladares F., J.B. Skillman, and R.W. Pearcy. 2002. Convergence in light capture efficiencies among tropical forest understory plants with contrasting crown architectures: a case of morphological compensation. American Journal of Botany 89:1275-1284.

Skillman, J.B., M. Garcia, and K. Winter. 1999. Whole-plant consequences of Crassulacean acid metabolism in an understory terrestrial bromeliad. Ecology 80:1584-1593.

Department of Biology | CSUSB CNS https://www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-NNF3VL8

Department of Biology

Department of Biology Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Biology is to contribute to the comprehensive liberal arts curriculum by fostering in students an appreciation of the relevance of the biological sciences to their lives and the choices they will be faced with as members of a society experiencing rapid technological advances. To this end, students will develop knowledge and skills that will enable them to evaluate the impact of their decisions on local, regional and global issues concerning the economy, personal health and welfare, and the environment. Students completing the biology major will be prepared for entry-level careers in science or to pursue advanced training in graduate and professional schools. To fulfill the mission, the biology curriculum is designed to address seven goals:

  • To provide an understanding of the mechanics, application and limitations of the scientific process
  • Develop an appreciation and understanding of evolution and the diversity of life
  • Demonstrate the relationships between structure, function and energy in living systems
  • Culture an appreciation for the historical development of scientific knowledge
  • Instruct students in effective utilization of discipline-specific information resources
  • Develop technical and analytical skills appropriate to modern biological investigation
  • Enhance both written and oral communication skills appropriate to the discipline